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Little Popo Agie River - Photo by Diana Olson

The Popo Agie Watershed contains three main streams that originate from high elevations near the Continental Divide in the  distinguished Wind River Mountain Range. These streams are fed by annual snow melt and seasonal precipitation, and each tiny amount of water flows together to form larger creeks and streams (known as tributaries). The watershed ends near Arapahoe where  the Popo Agie River joins the Little Wind River. Many tributaries flow together and eventually become one of the following:

North Fork of the Popo Agie River

The North Fork of the Popo Agie River is approximately 43 miles  long from the headwaters near Lonesome Lake to the confluence  with the Middle Fork of the Popo Agie River north of Lander. The  North Fork of the Popo Agie River is the southern boundary of the Wind River Indian Reservation. The North Fork contains 7,080  irrigated acres and drains nearly 117,600 total acres. Tributaries  include Surrell Creek, Mexican Creek, and Paradise Creek, as well  as Shoshone Lake.

Little Popo Agie River
The Little Popo Agie River boasts the largest drainage area in the  Popo Agie Watershed. The Little Popo Agie River is  approximately 58 miles long from the headwaters near Christina  Lake to the confluence with the Popo Agie River in  Hudson. It contains 6,662 irrigated acres and drains  approximately 238,630 total acres. Tributaries include Twin  Creek, Red Canyon Creek, Beason Creek, and Willow Creek, as well as Christina Lake.

North Fork Popo Agie River
Middle Fork Popo Agie River - Photo by Diana Olson

Middle Fork of the Popo Agie River 

The Middle Fork of the Popo Agie River is approximately 54 miles long from the headwaters near Bill’s Park to the confluence with the Little Popo Agie River at the Town of Hudson. The Middle Fork contains 11,503 irrigated  acres and drains nearly 166,120 total acres. Tributaries include Baldwin  Creek, Squaw Creek, and Sawmill Creek, as well as Frye Lake and Worthen  Meadow Reservoir.

Hydrology